Smart Cities in Geography Review

Geography Review is a brand new magazine for sixth formers (grade 12-13 in the US) studying any subject but particularly those who are interested in geography. In the UK geography is one of the top subjects in high school and the new magazine covers new ideas that are making their way into the geography curriculum. I have produced a poster that you can download if you click on the image above or directly from the web site. You will find the content if you log on here and this gives you a quiz about the articles in this first issue. Your library will need to subscribe but the first issue is on drought and hazards amongst several other things, including my own poster which is on Smart Cities. I don’t know how big you can print this poster at but it is certainly ok at A3 scale and I hope you can make it a lot bigger. Little kids even might be interested so show you children.

GeoComputation 2017

2017 International Conference on GeoComputation: Celebrating 21 Years of GeoComputation 4-7 September at the University of Leeds

Stan Openshaw and his colleagues set up the first meeting 21 years ago in Leeds and it returns there for its coming of age. Some good papers will be presented but we have published some commentaries in Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science on the state of the art in GeoComputataion, and you can get these by logging on here. All freely downloadable. Read the words of wisdom and incisive critique and commentary on GeoComputation from

Editorial: GeoComputation: Michael Batty

Commentaries: More bark than bytes? Reflections on 21+ years of GeoComputation: Richard Harris, David O’Sullivan, Mark Gahegan, Martin Charlton, Lex Comber, Paul Longley, Chris Brunsdon, Nick Malleson, Alison Heppenstall, Alex Singleton, Daniel Arribas-Bel and Andy Evans

Data and the City

Questioning what bigness means in terms of Big Data and the City is a key quest in understanding what the massive increase in data volumes means to understanding the urban challenges that lie ahead and our future planning of the city to alleviate the many problems that currently beset them. Kitchin, Lauriault, and McArdle’s book Data and the City is “…the first edited collection to provide an interdisciplinary analysis of how this new era of urban big data is reshaping how we come to know and govern cities, and the implications of such a transformation. This book looks at the creation of real-time cities and data-driven urbanism and considers the relationships at play. By taking a philosophical, political, practical and technical approach to urban data, the authors analyse the ways in which data is produced and framed within socio-technical systems. They then examine the constellation of existing and emerging urban data technologies. The volume concludes by considering the social and political ramifications of data-driven urbanism, questioning whom it serves and for what ends” (from the Routledge web site).

I have a paper in the book about big data: Batty, M. (2017) Data About Cities: Redefining Big, Recasting Small, in Kitchin, R., Lauriault, T. P., and MaArdle, G. (Editors) Data and the City, Routledge, London, 31-43, that you can download here in its original form.